Posts belonging to Category Sterling



Pound stabilises above post-election lows, political uncertainty reigns supreme

After falling in reaction to the outcome of Thursday’s general election, the pound is beginning the week in a more stable position.

After falling in reaction to the outcome of Thursday’s general election, the pound is beginning the week in a more stable position.

The GBP/USD exchange rate is also likely to stumble on Wednesday, with the Federal Reserve expected to increase interest rates at its latest policy gathering.

When PM Theresa May called for a snap election back in April her campaign hinged on the promise of maintaining strength and stability during the UK’s Brexit negotiations.

However, it’s fairly safe to say that her ability to deliver on that promise is now in question, with Thursday’s vote leaving the nation more mired in uncertainty than ever.

The Conservatives succeeded in losing their majority, a result which is unlikely to strengthen Theresa May’s hand in exit talks.

May has so far resisted calls for her resignation but the prospect of a minority government backed by the DUP is currently failing to excite much confidence in the government’s ability to secure a good deal for Britain.

While the pound has now stabilised following Friday’s sell off, it remains at multi-week and multi-month lows against the major currencies.

Wise Money markets ahead

With no potentially exciting economic reports on the calendar for today, the fallout from last week’s vote will remain the main driver of GBP exchange rate movement.

If the outcome of the election leads to the pursuit of a ‘soft Brexit’ (where the UK retains access to the single market) the pound could ultimately benefit.

However, if it appears that those members of the Conservative party pushing for a complete severing of the UK’s relationship with the EU are more likely to get their way now that May has lost her majority, the pound could be headed for new lows over the next few weeks.

In light of everything that has happened/is happening, tomorrow’s UK inflation stats may prove less influential than usual.

That being said, the pound could come under further pressure if the rate of inflation eases.

Although the odds of the Bank of England (BoE) reconsidering its current stance on interest rates are minimal (especially in the face of such political uncertainty) easing consumer price pressures would certainly add to the argument in favour of keeping borrowing costs lower for longer.

The GBP/USD exchange rate is also likely to stumble on Wednesday, with the Federal Reserve expected to increase interest rates at its latest policy gathering.

 

 

 

Pound reels as UK left with hung parliament

Is there further for the pound to fall?

Is there further for the pound to fall?

The UK took to the polls yesterday in GE2017 and it is fairly safe to say that Prime Minister Theresa May didn’t get the result she was hoping for.

The pound was left reeling as the votes were calculated and the Conservatives fell short of the 326 seats required for a majority.

The fallout from the election will be the driving force behind GBP exchange rate movement over the rest of the day.

The pound surged back in April when PM Theresa May called the snap election on the widely held belief that the Conservatives would storm their way to an increased majority.

Bets that a landslide victory would strengthen Theresa May’s hand in Brexit negotiations initially kept the pound elevated, but the currency started losing ground as a rocky campaign left her victory in doubt.

GBP exchange rates dropped 2% as last night’s exit polls pointed to a hung parliament, and this time the polls proved accurate.

While these movements are hardly as dramatic as seen following the EU referendum last year, there could be further shifts on the horizon.

With the Conservatives failing to secure the required majority, the UK’s political landscape looks murkier than ever.

If Theresa May listens to calls for her resignation the situation will be even more tenuous with only days left until Brexit negotiations are due to commence.

Wise Money markets ahead

The fallout from the election will be the driving force behind GBP exchange rate movement over the rest of the day, with any shocking announcements (like Theresa May’s resignation) having the potential to extend the pound’s losses.

However, a rapid turnaround in coalition talks and the quick establishment of a working government could help the pound recover.

Although the UK is set to publish industrial/manufacturing production, construction output, trade and growth figures, the data is unlikely to have an impact with eyes so firmly focused on the outcome of yesterday’s historic vote.

 

 

 

Election jitters continue to grip pound

Unsurprisingly, the pound had election poll results to contend with yesterday.

 

Unsurprisingly, the pound had election poll results to contend with yesterday.

The pound has once again become a politically-correlated currency, following developments in election polls over economic data.

As a result, sterling continued to trend around its multi-week lows yesterday against many of its peers.

While the currency markets are scared by the latest UK election surveys, they’re not necessarily convinced.

According to a poll by Survation, the Conservative Party were only one point ahead of the Labour Party, while YouGov’s seat-by-seat projections were now indicating the Tories could end up 22 seats short of a majority.

The polls are causing much confusion.

While Survation’s poll puts the candidates neck-and-neck, the results are weighted according to whether or not the voters themselves say they are likely to actually go to the ballots.

Other surveys, which weight their findings based upon average turnouts for the respondent’s age or social group, for example, find differently.

So, while the currency markets are scared by the latest UK election surveys, they’re not necessarily convinced.

GBP/EUR declined even though, from a broader point of view, the euro wasn’t doing particularly well itself.

Data from the Eurozone was mixed, with retail PMIs weakening for Germany, Italy and the Eurozone as a whole, but strengthening in France. The German construction PMI also rose, while the Sentix investor confidence index beat predictions for June and Eurozone retail sales volumes outpaced estimates at 2.5%.

Weakness in the pound was the only thing that allowed the US dollar to make any gains, pushing GBP/USD marginally lower. Big things are happening in the US as well as the UK, so the currency markets were holding their breath for Thursday’s developments.

Today is the calm before a triple-whammy storm on Thursday, which is likely to see the pound stagnating against most of the major currencies.

An approaching election might be dragging force on sterling, but with other high-profile global happenings on the calendar, GBP could be afforded something of a reprieve.

 

 

 

 

Little on European markets but potential big day for the GBPUSD pair

The key event of yesterday the June ECB meeting had little effect on wise money markets.

The key event of yesterday the June ECB meeting had little effect on wise money markets.

Mario Draghi continued to put emphasis on the ECB standing ready to input more Quantitative easing, if deemed necessary.

Markets had little reaction as this is considered old news at this stage and as a result, there was no major direct influence on the Euro. Most of yesterday was generally fairly quiet in terms of other Euro data, or rather lack of.

Looking at the main Euro pairs over the last 24 hours, they’ve been trading in tight ranges and only differ slightly from yesterday’s open.

This is relatively calming following the yoyo-like movements we’ve previously been seeing due to Brexit uncertainty and the changing sentiment polls.

It looks like EURUSD is on its way back down from its early May rally and most of the majors are looking a little worse off than a couple of weeks ago.

 

Wise Money awaiting US Non-Farm Payroll figures

 

Looking ahead at the dollar, today we have the US Non-Farm Payroll figures for May due for release at 13:30.

Following the Fed’s preconditions of a rate hike being dependent on a continuing improvement in the labour market, these figures are likely to be watched very closely.

If today’s figure is close to the forecast (164,000), it should strengthen expectation for a Fed rate hike through the coming summer months.

This could provide us with some upwards movement as we move into this weekend.

 

 

 

 

 

Pound rattled on new referendum poll

The pound dived sharply yesterday on the release of a new poll that showed a surprise lead for the leave camp.

 

The pound dived sharply yesterday on the release of a new poll that showed a surprise lead for the leave camp.

Over the last two weeks we have seen good momentum for the pound off the back of polls, suggesting the remain camp was pulling ahead.

However, it was almost inevitable that we would see a conflicting poll suggesting the opposite, and yesterday two Guardian/ICM polls showed a split of 52%-48% in favour of a Brexit.

The pound fell sharply against the USD and the euro on this news, and is continuing to struggle this morning. In the run up to polling day we are likely to see the pound pulled around significantly as conflicting polls and news drive price action.

Wise money news to come

Today the focus will continue to be on the Brexit momentum as we start the month of June.

In addition we have ISM manufacturing data from the US later today and sentiment is split on the momentum for manufacturing, and a weak number cannot be ruled out.
Elsewhere, we have substantial amounts of PMI data from the Euro area, France and Germany. The initial Euro area number came in slightly weaker, however Germany and France both showed good uplift.

The interest today will be in the periphery and the potential for the numbers here to be soft.

 

Multi week lows for GBP on prospect of hung parliament

Sterling spiralled to multi-week lows against all the major currencies at the close of last week as unexpectedly tight election polls left the outcome of June’s vote in doubt.

Sterling spiralled to multi-week lows against all the major currencies at the close of last week as unexpectedly tight election polls left the outcome of June’s vote in doubt.

GBP/EUR dropped to a two-month low of €1.1432, GBP/USD slumped to one-month low of $1.2783, GBP/AUD brushed a worst rate of AU$1.7173, GBP/NZD tumbled to a six-week low of NZ$1.8115 and GBP/CAD was left trading in the region of C$1.7201.

Political developments will continue dominating headlines (and dictating pound movement) for much of this week with the election now just over a week away.

 

Wise Money market roundup

The pound (like the rest of us) was left really feeling the need for the Bank Holiday weekend, having experienced a bit of a dismal end to the week.

The resumption of political campaigning and the publication of the latest election polls conspired to send Sterling lower across the board.

The polls showed that Conservative’s lead against Labour had plummeted from 20 to 5 in just a matter of weeks.

Concerns that the election could result in a hung parliament left the pound at multi-week lows against the euro, US dollar and Canadian dollar.

The slide in GBP/USD was also the result of positively revised US growth data as the report boosted hopes that the Federal Reserve will increase interest rates in June.

Sterling was able to recoup some losses against the euro however amid concerns that the Greek bailout negotiations could come to a grinding halt. Greek Finance Minister Euclid Tsakalotos issued a warning to the nation’s creditors – Greece would not move on to the next stage of bailout discussions without the IMF and EU agreeing to debt relief.

What’s coming up money wise?

Political developments will continue dominating headlines (and dictating pound movement) for much of this week with the election now just over a week away.

There are no UK reports set for release today, but GBP/EUR fluctuations could follow the publication of the Eurozone’s economic/industrial/services and consumer confidence figures and German inflation stats for May.

Upbeat releases could see the pound return to its weakest levels against the euro.

Meanwhile, the US will be publishing personal consumption and consumer confidence numbers.

As long as the data supports the case in favour of the Federal Reserve increasing interest rates next month, the GBP/USD exchange rate is likely to remain trading in the region of a one-month low.

 

 

 

 

Pound tumbles as BoE hints that interest rates won’t climb until 2019

Yesterday wasn’t too super for the pound, with GBP exchange rates broadly declining in the wake of the BoE’s latest interest rate decision.

Yesterday wasn’t too super for the pound, with GBP exchange rates broadly declining in the wake of the BoE’s latest interest rate decision.

GBP/EUR dropped to a low of €1.1838, GBP/USD fell from $1.2944 to $1.2853, GBP/AUD edged from AU$1.7570 to AU$1.7439, GBP/NZD closed the day at NZ$1.8839 (up from a low of NZ$1.8774) and GBP/CAD dropped from C$1.7754 to C$1.7620.

Rising inflation could pressure the BoE into reconsidering its current stance on interest rates, so a stronger-than-anticipated result may boost GBP.

 

Wise Money Market roundup

Given that there wasn’t much going on for most of the week, the spotlight was really on Thursday’s trio of Bank of England (BoE) announcements.

Although ‘Super Thursday’ is the name applied when the BoE makes its interest rate decision, releases meeting minutes and publishes its inflation report, there wasn’t much super about yesterday.

Hopes that the central bank might vote for an increase in borrowing costs in the near future were quashed when only one member of the Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) voted for an immediate adjustment.

BoE Governor Mark Carney added to the pound’s woes. When asked if the current level of stimulus being employed by the central bank is excessive, he replied; ‘The stimulus isn’t excessive, it’s appropriate, first point, and that’s the judgement of the committee.’

Bets that borrowing costs won’t change until 2019 saw the pound fall away from its recent multi-month highs against the US, Australian, New Zealand and Canadian dollars.

The day’s other UK news wasn’t so hot either, with industrial output slowing in March and the nation’s trade deficit widening.

What’s coming up money wise?

With no UK news on the calendar for today, the pound may struggle to recover yesterday’s losses before the weekend.

Today’s Eurozone news (German growth and inflation numbers) came in largely as expected, although non-seasonally adjusted Q1 year-on-year growth beat forecasts and rose to 2.9%.

The GBP/USD exchange rate could slide further this afternoon if the US inflation report shows that consumer price pressures remained above target in April.

Looking ahead to next week and the main UK news to focus on includes the nation’s inflation, employment and retail sales data.

Rising inflation could pressure the BoE into reconsidering its current stance on interest rates, so a stronger-than-anticipated result may boost GBP.

A decent uptick in average earnings would also bolster the pound, as would signs that consumer spending remained strong in April.

 

 

 

GBP/EUR hits monthly high of €1.19

Gradual pound gains seem to be the theme of the week, with Sterling spending Tuesday sneaking its way higher against the majors.

Gradual pound gains seem to be the theme of the week, with Sterling spending Tuesday sneaking its way higher against the majors.

GBP/EUR advanced to a May high of €1.1921, GBP/USD tiptoed to an eight-month high of $1.2981, GBP/AUD surged from AU$1.7557 to AU$1.7649, GBP/NZD closed the day above NZ$1.8800 and GBP/CAD recovered from C$1.7673 to C$1.7816.

With ‘Super Thursday’ looming, what can we expect from the pound?

If the Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) is still split on whether interest rates should rise, the pound may hit new multi-month highs against the majors.

 

Wise Money market roundup

It’s been a pretty good week for the pound so far, with the currency quickly shaking off a slightly sluggish start and managing to achieve its best levels for months against several of its rivals.

Positive UK news came in the form of an impressive like-for-like sales report from the British Retail Consortium (BRC). Like-for-like sales had only been expected to increase 0.5% so the actual result of 5.6% was well received.

Meanwhile, the euro’s post-election rally stalled, the Australian dollar was weakened by a concerning slump in domestic retail sales, the Canadian dollar was pressured lower by sliding crude oil prices and the New Zealand dollar softened ahead of the Reserve Bank of New Zealand (RBNZ) interest rate decision.

What’s coming up money wise?

With another quiet day for UK data ahead, the pound may be on pause ahead of tomorrow’s ‘Super Thursday’ of Bank of England (BoE) announcements.

Given that the UK general election is just weeks away, the BoE is highly unlikely to make any changes to monetary policy, but the attitude of policymakers towards future adjustments will be key to how the pound ends the week.

If the Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) is still split on whether interest rates should rise, the pound may hit new multi-month highs against the majors.

However, if the MPC is united in its belief that policy should remain accommodative despite spiking inflation we could see Sterling give up this week’s gains.

The BoE will also be publishing its inflation report. Upwardly revised inflation forecasts could boost the odds of the central bank increasing interest rates in the near future and would therefore be pound-supportive.

The Reserve Bank of New Zealand (RBNZ) will be delivering its latest interest rate decision later today. If the RBNZ takes a cautious stance, GBP/NZD could be driven to new post-Brexit highs.

 

 

 

 

GBP/EUR back to €1.18 despite Macron’s triumph in French election

A trio of unexpectedly upbeat UK economic reports for the services, manufacturing and construction sectors left the pound pretty upbeat as markets closed for the weekend and Sterling remains close to multi-month highs.

A trio of unexpectedly upbeat UK economic reports for the services, manufacturing and construction sectors left the pound pretty upbeat as markets closed for the weekend and Sterling remains close to multi-month highs.

The GBP/EUR exchange rate begins this week at €1.1827 (up from this morning’s low of €1.1786), GBP/USD remains above $1.2950, GBP/AUD is trading at AU$1.7534 (up 5 cents from last week’s opening levels of AU$1.7070), GBP/NZD is holding NZ$1.8700 and GBP/CAD’s current rate of C$1.7735 is one of its highest since the UK voted to Brexit last year.

What impact did the French election have on GBP/EUR?

The new French President has intimated he will be taking a tough stance on Brexit, and any further hints that he plans to make the UK’s exit from the EU difficult could send the pound lower.

 

Wise Money Market Roundup

The new French President has intimated he will be taking a tough stance on Brexit, and any further hints that he plans to make the UK’s exit from the EU difficult could send the pound lower.

Although the reports aren’t expected to alter the Bank of England’s (BoE) current attitude on interest rates, they are at least an encouraging sign of how the UK economy is performing.

The data was enough to give the pound a leg up against its peers and help it shake off concerns surrounding the fraught relationship between Prime Minister Theresa May and EU officials.

Meanwhile, over in France, Centrist Emmanuel Macron managed to crush far-right Marine Le Pen in the second round of the French election, taking 65% of the vote.

While this outcome has helped dispel Frexit fears, it was so long expected that its impact on the euro was pretty minimal. EUR exchange rates did enjoy a small rally immediately after the results were announced, but quickly fell back to previous levels.

The Australian dollar came under pressure this morning as domestic building approvals plummeted (exacerbating worries about the Australian housing bubble) and China’s trade data revealed a sharp slump in imports.

 

What’s coming up money wise?

Today’s economic calendar isn’t exactly bursting with exciting releases, but there are a couple of reports to look out for.

The Eurozone’s Sentix Investor Confidence index for May is expected to climb from 23.9 to 25.2 – a potentially euro-positive result.

Canada is also set to release housing starts data, while the US rounds off the day with its measure of labour market conditions.

Macron’s victory may also be responsible for further movement in the currency market in the days and weeks ahead. The new French President has intimated he will be taking a tough stance on Brexit, and any further hints that he plans to make the UK’s exit from the EU difficult could send the pound lower.

 

 

 

 

Pound boosted by unexpected UK economic strength

While the pound might have failed to get the upper hand against the euro, upbeat UK data helped Sterling strengthen against the US, Australian, New Zealand and Canadian dollars.

While the pound might have failed to get the upper hand against the euro, upbeat UK data helped Sterling strengthen against the US, Australian, New Zealand and Canadian dollars.

The GBP/EUR exchange rate dropped from €1.1812 to €1.1753 but GBP/USD advanced from $1.2844 to $1.2941, GBP/AUD hit an eight-month high of AU$1.7530 and GBP/NZD fluctuated between NZ$1.8701 and NZ$1.8869.

 

Wise Money Market Roundup

What’s been happening?

A better-than-forecast UK services PMI gave the pound a bit of a boost on Thursday and helped the currency recover its previous Brexit-related losses.

The services report came in at 55.8 (beating predictions of 54.5) and rounding off a trio of unexpectedly perky releases.

Markit economist Chris Williamson said of the report; ‘The upturn in the services PMI rounds off a hat trick of good news after upside surprises to both the manufacturing and construction PMIs. The three surveys collectively point to GDP growing at a rate of 0.6% at the start of the second quarter.

While we expect consumer spending to slacken in coming months, with the April survey highlighting continued weakness in sectors such as hotels, restaurants and other household-facing businesses, there’s good reason to believe that at least 0.4% GDP growth can be achieved in the second quarter as a whole.’

The news that Prince Philip will be retiring from public life later this year didn’t impact the pound, but it did dominate headlines for much of the day.

Meanwhile, the belief that Centrist Emmanuel Macron won the final televised debate of the French Presidential election bolstered support for the euro ahead of Sunday’s vote, weakening GBP/EUR in the process.

What’s coming up?

The pound could extend gains against the US dollar before the weekend if the US non-farm payrolls report disappoints. Any weakness in the labour market could make the Federal Reserve think twice about raising interest rates in June.

Sunday’s French election will be the catalyst for GBP/EUR movement at the beginning of next week. The euro could rally if Macron does take the Presidency, despite his victory being so long expected.

However, if 2017 turns out to be as politically shocking as 2016 and far-right Marine Le Pen emerges triumphant, EUR exchange rates are likely to record dramatic losses.

Next week the most high-profile events on the UK’s economic calendar are the publication of UK trade data and the Bank of England’s interest rate decision/inflation report.

The BoE is highly unlikely to take any action at this juncture, and the minutes from its report may err on the side of caution in light of the upcoming UK general election.